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Seer of ghosts & weaver of stories

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Autism spectrum resource recommendations?
Strength
ajodasso
I've finally found the time to read this book, which I've had since August. I'm finding it engaging, informative, and the right balance of clinical / anecdotal, although the author definitely seems to have fairly rigid ideas about "girls on the autism spectrum are like X" and "boys on the autism spectrum are like Y" and rarely in twain the two shall meet; you can point out trends from research data, but please at least acknowledge that you have a somewhat traditionalist approach in the way you regard gender, dear author). I've been told I should read Thinking in Pictures and Aspergirls next, and I'm finding link-and-book posts from ada_hoffmann and shehasathree helpful.

Still, if there's anything out there that's more off the beaten track that you think might be worth my attention, let me know? I'm reading more than I'm writing for once.

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I found Aspergirls very heteronormative and there were certain sentiments, attitudes and opinions expressed that I really wasn't fond of.

Women From Another Planet? is one I haven't read but have read good reviews for.

Loud Hands, Autistic People Speaking is by the Autistic Self-Advocacy Network (ASAN) and is meant to be good, but some printings of it, the text block is hard to read.

You may get people telling you to read Liane Holliday Wiley, I would say to avoid, her books have an emphasis on passing and she is known for expressing 'Aspie elitist' sentiments.

Two recent Australian books that I liked a lot - Reaching One Thousand by Rachel Robertson and Boomer & Me by Jo Case. Both are mothers of autistic kids with autistic features themselves, and very positive attitudes to letting their kids be themselves.

Elijah's Cup by Valerie Paradiz, Not Even Wrong by Paul Collins and The Spark by Kristine Barnett also parental accounts that are excellent.

Reasonable People by Ralph James Savarese wonderful but somewhat harrowing parental account (with content from DJ, his son). Very autistic acceptance positive, very alternative communication positive, but a lot of descriptions of child abuse and the emotional/psychological fallout of abuse. I really think it's one of the best books I've read, but I understand that it is not for everyone.

autistics.org booklist (out of date but still good)

autisticbooks has sort of taken over where the autistics.org list left off. Excellent.

A zine recently published by/for autistic people and available for free on the web - No Missing Pieces. (I submitted a piece I'd written to it. :)

If you're looking for things other than books, both Loving Lampposts and Wretches and Jabberers are excellent documentaries available on DVD. As parental accounts go, The Horse Boy and The Sunshine Boy are also pretty good. My Family and Autism was a documentary made maybe ten years ago about the Jackson family in the UK, you can watch it on daily motion HERE.

Also, in case you hadn't guessed, I have a substantial library of books about autism, books written by parents of autistic kids, and books by autistic people. If there is something specific you're looking for, I may be able to help.

Women From Another Planet? is one I haven't read but have read good reviews for. Loud Hands, Autistic People Speaking is by the Autistic Self-Advocacy Network (ASAN) and is meant to be good, but some printings of it, the text block is hard to read.

Thank you. These few titles are next on my reading list, I think!

I recently submitted some work to Barking Sycamores, which is a magazine geared toward the work of neurodivergent writers. No Missing Pieces is not one I've encountered before, so I will check it out.

A couple I probably should have added yesterday, but didn't:

Wendy Lawson and Donna Williams are both also worth reading if you get the chance. Wendy Lawson's Life Behind Glass was the first book I ever read about autism or by an autistic person. Both Wendy and Donna have written both autobiographical works and works about the nature of autism itself. I can't speak to the quality of everything they've written, since I haven't read them all and I own very few of their books (I own two of Wendy's, three of Donna's) but both are certainly worth reading at least their first autobiographical volumes of. Life Behind Glass - Wendy Lawson and Nobody Nowhere - Donna Williams. Donna's first book came out about the same time Temple Grandin's first book, Emergence, did, just to give you some historical context, but their lives have been very different in many ways.

Another female autist who gets very little attention paid her is Lucy Blackman. Her book is generally a little on the pricier side (it rarely appears second-hand) but it's genuinely interesting and a very good personal account by an autistic woman who primarily uses typing to communicate. Her book is still in print by JKP, simply called Lucy's Story (the subheading varies depending on the print run).

(Promise I'll stop throwing books at you now. Unless you want more, of course!)

I'm interested in moving on to the autobiographical next, to be honest, so these recs are especially appreciated <3

I'm not very good at the "nonfiction books" side of things, but I want to second iamshadow's opinion of Aspergirls.

To be fair to the author, there is some positive mention of relationship arrangements other than heterosexual monogamy, but every time she mention such things, she feels a need to reassure all the heteronormative parents who are reading. ("Some of us do X or Y and that's okay, but don't worry! Most of us are romantically normal!"). And there is other sexist stuff, like the framing of girls asking boys out as a social mistake.

It's actually not a bad book for people who are new to the topic of how autism presents in women and girls, but you have to be able to read it with a filter in place. If that sounds like it would offend you or stress you out, definitely skip it and go for something more politically aware.

Temple Grandin, meanwhile, is an interesting person, but there is a lot of criticism of her for over-generalizing her experiences as if they apply to all autistic people when they don't, and for over-relying on the medical model.

I've heard some very good things about Loud Hands - it is pretty much the foremost nonfiction book recommended by the autism bloggers I read. I haven't read it yet myself, but it's on my "to buy when I have money" list.

It's actually not a bad book for people who are new to the topic of how autism presents in women and girls, but you have to be able to read it with a filter in place.

Thank you for this caveat in particular. If I end up reading it, I'll make sure I'm wearing the proper goggles. As for Loud Hands, that is a title with which I'm not familiar, so I will seek it out.

There is a book called Autism and Gender? Count me in *thumbs up*

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